Alimony alabamaAlimony in Alabama is interim support provided by the court to the spouse who is unable to financially support herself after divorce. Alimony rules differ significantly from state to state, and courts frequently have extensive discretion in determining whether or not to grant alimony, how much alimony to award, and its duration.

Read the article to know more.

How To Calculate the Spousal Support in Alabama?

In Alabama divorce law, there is no defined method for establishing alimony amount. In general, the amount of alimony is determined by the receiving spouse’s needs and the paying spouse’s ability to pay alimony.

– Amount of Alimony

In order to calculate the amount of money the court will look at items like the parties’ monthly living expenditures, their income, their assets, their respective responsibilities, their debts, and their monthly living expenses to give or stop alimony in alabama.

The decision to come to a specific alimony amount is a difficult process that takes into account a variety of criteria. An expert Alabama divorce attorney can analyze your situation and provide information as to probable results in your specific case.

While there is no Alabama alimony calculator that will calculate the precise amount of alimony you or your husband will receive, judges examine a number of variables when determining the proper amount of alimony. Further, the factors to calculate alimony are mentioned later in this article.

– Duration of Alimony

The duration of alimony depends upon the type of Alimony granted, which are discussed later in this article. The period differ from case to case basis.

Divorce is a rough patch. Not only does a divorce require a lot of time and effort, but it also has a significant financial and emotional impact on the parties involved. Alimony is one of the most prevalent difficulties that arise during a divorce process. Periodic alimony, rehabilitative alimony, and alimony in gross are the three types of alimony in Alabama.

What we commonly refer to as alimony is periodic alimony. The goal of periodic alimony, in theory, is to keep the parties’ economic condition the same as it was before the marriage.

This sort of alimony is typically provided in the form of regular payments, such as monthly installments, of a defined amount payable to the ex-spouse. Periodic alimony can last until one of the parties dies, remarries, or cohabits, or it can stop after a set period of time has elapsed, allowing the party receiving alimony to acquire the financial means to sustain themselves.

Periodic alimony is only available for a certain amount of time. It’s crucial to remember that Alabama divorce courts are equity courts, which means the judge will endeavor to do what’s right.

How To Pay Alimony in Alabama?

In Alabama, alimony is only awarded after a divorce if the marriage and the subsequent divorce meet certain criteria. When one spouse in a divorced marriage has no separate estate from the other, or if the estate isn’t significant enough to support the spouse, a judge may order an allowance from the wealthier spouse’s estate to be provided to the less fortunate spouse.

Pay alimony in alabamaThis payout is based on a variety of variables, including both spouses’ contributions to the marriage’s success and any assistance one spouse provided to the other, the length of the marriage, and more. Previously acquired property or inherited property may not be included in the estate.

Unless evidence is supplied that the property, or income generated from it, was utilized frequently by both individuals during the marriage.

– Determining the Amount

Many factors are considered while determining the amount of alimony payments to be made and the length of time they will be made. When reviewing the decision, the judge may add the current value of pension plans in either spouse’s estate value; the marriage must have lasted at least 10 years throughout the accumulation of this retirement fund for this to take effect; unless a lump-sum agreement is made.

Misconduct by either party in the relationship, such as if the cause of the divorce in Alabama was solely due to one party’s intentional actions. Furthermore, if the party at fault was involved in criminal activities, will frequently be considered in determining whether alimony is to be awarded or not; depending on who was at fault and the severity of the misconduct.

In Alabama, alimony is awarded at the judge’s final verdict, as it is in most other states.

How To Avoid Paying Alimony in Alabama?

The spousal support Alabam can be changed. It can be increased, decreased, or canceled in specific circumstances under Alabama divorce law. This is important to avoid misuse of the alimony paid and make the person pay alimony according to his earning capacity.

– Modification of Alimony

To change alimony, you must submit a request to the court. The court must determine if there has been a material change in one or both parties’ circumstances. The court will consider the following elements in assessing whether there has been a meaningful change:

  • The paying spouse’s remarriage
  • A change in the receiving spouse’s employment situation
  • A change in the parties’ financial circumstances
  • An occurrence that has a major impact on the ability to pay alimony (increases or reduces).
  • Changes in health, education, or age that are significant
  • The amount of time between the initial alimony award and the modification request

– Termination of Alimony

According to Alabama law, alimony will be cancelled if a person lives openly or cohabits with another person. Cohabitation may be very aggravating for an alimony payer since the alimony recipient may use the money to sustain a new relationship with their new partner, and the recipient of the alimony may also be getting financial assistance from the new partner. As a result, it’s critical to understand what constitutes cohabitation and how evidence of such a relationship may be presented in court.

FAQ

These are some of the frequently asked questions:

– What Are the Types of Alimony in Alabama?

There are four types of alimony available to spouses in divorces: interim alimony, rehabilitative, financial status quo and granting the alimony. The Alabama alimony laws have changed as of January 1, 2018, so only these types of alimony available to spouses in divorces filed on or after that date.

  1. Interim Alimony

While the case is still pending, that is, before a final divorce ruling, “interim” alimony is a temporary award that the judge may make to the supported spouse. This type of assistance is meant to help the less fortunate spouse financially during the divorce process.

  1. Rehabilitative

When it comes to alimony, the court might award either “rehabilitative” or “periodicalimony after the divorce is finalized. The court must conclude that all of the following factors exist in order to award either of these:

  • When one spouse lacks the financial means to maintain, the financial condition that existed during the marriage, the other spouse has the financial means to provide those means without causing undue economic hardship, and the circumstances of the case make paying alimony fair.
  1. Financial Status Quo

Rehabilitative alimony helps a partner to regain the financial status quo that existed throughout the marriage. For example, a spouse may be required to obtain certain training in order to enter or re-enter the workforce. In Alabama, this is the recommended type of alimony, and a judge should award it unless otherwise mentioned in the facts of the case. The period of rehabilitative alimony cannot exceed five years under the legislation (unless there are extraordinary circumstances).

In cases where the court observes this alimony is not provided (or has been tried with little or no success), the court can award periodic alimony for a set period of time, that may help the supported spouse to return to the financial condition that existed during the marriage (as far as possible).

In most cases, the length of periodic alimony payments cannot exceed the length of the marriage. That is why, if the marriage lasted nine years, the alimony payment duration cannot be more than nine years. There are two exceptions to this rule. One is if the court determines that limiting the time period is unjust. The other is where the marriage lasted 20 years or more, in which case periodic alimony payments have no temporal limit.

  1. Granting the Alimony

Alimony in gross is a less typical type of alimony awarded by Alabama divorce courts. In its broadest sense, alimony is concerned with the property interests of the divorcing spouse. This sort of is used by Alabama courts to end a party’s property interest, usually through monetary payment.

However, alimony awards in the aggregate may not always take the form of monetary payments. In Alabama, alimony in gross can be paid by granting the recipient lifetime access to a home or other piece of property. Alimony in the aggregate is intended to influence a final determination of the parties’ property rights. In general, alimony is not used to provide one party with future assistance.

Judges in Alabama divorce courts consider the following variables when deciding whether to grant alimony in full:

  • The earning capacity of the married partners.
  • Their material property’s origin.
  • The duration of the relationship.
  • The value of each party’s contribution.

– Who Are the People Entitled to Alabama Spousal Maintenance?

A court must determine people entitled to Alabama Spousal Maintenance based on the requesting spouse is financially reliant on the other and that the other spouse is financially capable of paying alimony. A court will first assess whether independent assets or any marital assets received in an equitable property division will provide an adequate means of support without an alimony order when analyzing a spouse’s need. This means that alimony is always decided after the property has been divided.

The court will not consider any independent property that the paying spouse possessed before the marriage unless it was used as a source of income during the marriage when determining the paying spouse’s ability to give support.

As a general rule, the longer the marriage, the more likely alimony will be granted. However, this isn’t always the case, and the court will consider a variety of other circumstances. The factors are not exhaustive, and they are not always equally weighted.

Factors to Take into Account:

  • The duration of the union
  • Each partner’s age and state of health
  • Each spouse’s ability to sustain themselves
  • The reason for the marriage’s demise
  • The combined earnings of both parties
  • During the marriage, the standard of life

The court will also assess whether there is something about a particular marriage that is special. One example is when a court considers the fact that one spouse is disabled or suffering from a debilitating illness.

It can also be crucial if one spouse has put their profession on hold to earn for the family or to allow the other partner to finish their studies or develop in their career. In such cases, the court is more likely to award alimony to the spouse who provided the required at-home support to allow the other spouse to pursue their education or career goals.

– What Are the Factors To Consider While Calculating Alimony?

A court firstly consider the cause of the divorce, length of the marriage, and children’s responsibility while calculating alimony. Foremost being the cause of the divorce: In Alabama, you can still assert blame grounds in a divorce. If a couple of files for divorce are based on blame, alimony may be affected. You can petition for divorce on the grounds of adultery if your spouse cheated on you and you can prove that the cheating prompted you to wish to divorce them.

If the receiving spouse is unfaithful, the alimony award may be reduced. A judge may also order a cheating spouse to pay more in alimony.

Secondly, Length of the marriage: In Alabama, how long must you have been married to be eligible for alimony? Technically, the answer is that it doesn’t matter.

Regardless of the length of the marriage, a court can give alimony if the petitioning spouse can demonstrate a necessity. However, the longer the marriage, the more probable one partner adjusted to the additional financial support of married life and will want assistance in readjusting to living following the divorce.

As previously stated, permanent alimony is only granted in rare cases where the marriage has lasted more than 20 years.

Thirdly, children’s responsibility: Depending on the terms of the divorce, one spouse may be responsible for more financial aspects of child-rearing and care. If a child has special needs, it may be difficult for one partner to work and care for the child at the same time.

Further Factors:

  • Earning possibilities for each spouse in the future.
  • During the marriage, the standard of living for each parent.
  • The ages and health of the spouses.
  • Any dependent children’s need.
  • The services of a spouse as a housewife or parent.
  • Any other considerations that the court thinks important.

This is not a complete list of factors. Any factor related to an appropriate alimony award may be considered by the court.

– What are the Periodic Alimony Laws?

Periodic Alimony Laws in Alabama is laws governed by Alabama Code § 30-2-57. A domestic relations judge may only grant alimony if all of the following conditions are met:

  • A party does not have a separate estate, or his or her separate estate is insufficient to maintain the parties’ economic lifestyle (or status quo) during the marriage.
  • The other party has the financial means to make payments that allow the other party to maintain the same standard of living as before the marriage.
  • The facts of the divorce case make alimony a fair award.

In most cases, periodic alimony is paid until the recipient remarries, cohabits with someone of the opposite sex, or becomes self-sufficient.

The term “self-supporting” refers to a situation in which the individual receiving alimony has a larger financial estate than the person paying alimony.

If either the person receiving alimony or the person paying alimony dies, alimony will come to an end. In any case, it’s a good idea to speak with an attorney about what to do if you suspect alimony is about to end.

Conclusion

Alimony in alabamaConsidering Alabama’s divorce courts are equity courts, the judge will consider the reasons listed above and endeavor to make decisions that are fair to both parties in the marriage. As a result, having an experienced divorce lawyer who not only understands the case but can also argue the benefits of each component in your favor is critical in any divorce case.

Especially when alimony is at stake!

Further, we conclude the following:

  • When one spouse in a divorced marriage has no separate estate from the other, or if the estate isn’t significant enough to support the spouse, a judge may order an allowance from the wealthier spouse’s estate to be provided to the less fortunate spouse.
  • Misconduct by either party in the relationship, such as if the cause of the divorce was solely due to one party’s intentional actions or if the party at fault was involved in criminal activities, will frequently be considered in determining whether alimony is to be awarded or not; depending on who was at fault and the severity of the misconduct.
  • While there is no Alabama alimony calculator that will calculate the precise amount of alimony you or your husband will receive, judges examine a number of variables when determining the proper amount of alimony.
  • Periodic alimony is paid until the recipient remarries, cohabits with someone of the opposite sex, or becomes self-sufficient. The term “self-supporting” refers to a situation in which the individual receiving alimony has a larger financial estate than the person paying alimony.
  • In Alabama, alimony is only awarded after a divorce if the marriage and the subsequent divorce meet certain criteria. Alimony can be increased, decreased, or canceled in specific circumstances under Alabama divorce law.

Exercise your right to take alimony after carefully examining the facts and circumstances of your case and we hope you take a legally informed decision after reading this article.

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