When a teenager wants to live with non custodial parent, the parent might consider seeking modification of the child custody order. It can be confusing for both parents – the custodial parent won’t allow it, while the non-custodial parent doesn’t want to go against the child’s wishes.

Teenager wants to live with non custodial parent

However, parents must respect court orders and follow state law guidelines regarding custody modification. This article highlights the particulars of modifying a custody order and dealing with a teen who wants to change residency.

Could a Teenager Choose To Live With a Non-Custodial Parent?

A teenager could choose to live with a non-custodial parent, but their wishes may not influence the court’s decision. In most states, the law lets a child decide the parent to live with when they attain the age of majority (usually 18 years). 

However, teenagers’ rights to decide which parent to live with will depend on their resident state’s laws and the specific circumstances of their case. In general, however, the court will always consider the child’s best interests when making a custody determination. That means that the court will consider the teenager’s preferences, but the teenager’s wishes do not necessarily bind it.

In some states, if a 16 year-old wants to live with non custodial parent, they may express their preferences to the court directly, either through a written statement or by testifying in court.

In other states, the court may appoint a guardian ad litem to represent the teenager’s interests and recommend to the court which parent the teenager should live with. However, the court will not necessarily grant their request if the child wants to live with other parent.

Can You Modify a Custody Order if the Teenager Wants To Live With the Non-Custodial Parent?

You can modify a custody order if the teenager wants to live with the non-custodial parent, but the results may depend on a few factors. The process for modifying a custody order will vary depending on the state’s laws and the case’s specific circumstances.

If a child no longer wants to live with mother, the father will need to ask the court to modify the custody order to allow the teenager to live with him. 

Can you modify a custody order

To begin the process, you must file a motion to modify custody with the court that issued the original custody order. This motion should explain why you believe it is in the best interests of your teenager for them to live with you.

– Reason for Seeking Modification of the Custody Order

Some common reasons that a non custodial parent may seek to modify a custody order to allow their teenager to live with them include:

  • A change in circumstances, including a change in the living situation or work schedule of the custodial parent
  • A belief that the teenager would be better cared for by the non-custodial parent
  • A desire by the teenager to live with the non-custodial parent

The court will always consider the best interests of the child when deciding whether to modify a custody order. That means you must provide evidence to support your claim that it is in your teenager’s best interest to live with you.

It is always best to try to reach an agreement with the other parent outside of court and devise a parenting plan, as going to court can be costly and emotionally draining for everyone involved. If you can’t reach an agreement, it is vital to seek the guidance of a family law attorney who can help you navigate the process and represent your interests in court.

– Factors Considered Before Modification of the Custody Order

The court will consider several factors when determining whether to modify a custody order. Below are some of the factors that the court may consider:

  • The teenager’s best interests: Courts consider a child’s physical, emotional, and psychological well-being, as well as their overall best interests.
  • The child’s preference: A child aged 12 or above can express a preference, and the court may consider the child’s wishes.
  • Each parent’s relationship with the child: The court will consider the child’s relationship with each parent and how that relationship may be affected by a change in custody.
  • Each parent’s ability to provide a stable and nurturing environment: The court will consider the parent’s ability to provide a safe, stable, and nurturing environment for the child.
  • The potential for cooperation between the parents: The court will consider whether the parents can communicate and cooperate in matters concerning the child.
  • Any history of abuse or neglect: If there is a history of abuse or neglect, the court may consider this factor when determining custody.
  • Any changes in circumstances: The court will consider any significant changes that may affect the child’s well-being, such as changes in the parents’ living situations or employment status.

It’s important to note that these are just some factors that the court may consider when determining whether to modify a custody order. The specific factors that the court considers will depend on the case’s particular circumstances.

How To Deal With a Teenager Wanting To Live With a Non-Custodial Parent?

To deal with a teenager wanting to live with a non-custodial parent, a lot of patience and understanding is needed. It can be difficult and emotional for a teenager to want to live with a non-custodial parent, and it’s essential to approach the situation with sensitivity. 

How to deal with a teenager wanting to live with a non custodial parent

So, what to do if child wants to live with non-custodial parent?

– Listen to Your Teenager’s Perspective

It’s important to take the time to listen to your teenager’s thoughts and feelings about wanting to live with the non custodial parent. Try to understand their perspective and what is driving their desire to make this change.

– Talk Openly and Honestly

You should have an open conversation with your teenager about their wishes. Explain your perspective and any concerns you may have about them living with the non custodial parent.

– Seek Support

It can be helpful to seek the support of a trusted family member, friend, or mental health professional as you navigate this situation.

– Consider Compromise

If your teenager is insistent on living with the non custodial parent, you may need to consider compromise. That could involve finding ways to allow your teenager to spend more time with the non custodial parent or making the transition easier for everyone involved.

Remember that it’s normal for teenagers to want independence. It’s normal for teenagers to want to assert their independence and make their own decisions. While this can be difficult for parents, it’s an important part of growing up and becoming an adult.

Conclusion

If a teenager wants to live with a non-custodial parent, the court must intervene before the child can change residence. So, what are the main things to keep in mind if, say, a 14 year old wants to live with non custodial parent?

  • Courts may listen to the wishes of children aged 12 or above but aren’t bound by their wishes or preferences.
  • If a teenager wants to change their primary residency, the non-custodial parent must first file a motion to modify the custody order.
  • Courts will consider a host of factors before deciding whether or not to modify the custody order.
  • Parents should handle teens seeking to change their primary residence with understanding since expressing their wishes and desire for independence is part of their growth process.

If your 17 year old wants to live with non custodial parent, it is important to speak with an attorney or a legal aid organization for guidance on your options and the process for seeking a change in custody. It is also important to communicate with your child openly to understand their feelings and concerns and deal with the situation constructively.

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