80 20 custody schedule implies custody of a kid spending 80 percent of their time with one parent and 20 percent with the other. One parent normally has primary physical custody in these instances. However, when the agreement is sole physical custody with scheduled visitation, this form of custody schedule may be used.

Calculating the percentage of parenting time might be difficult. In this type of arrangement, the non-custodial parent usually gets three overnight visits every two weeks. Although they can, those visits don’t have to be in any particular order.

Several things will influence how well the 80 20 parenting plan works.

Among the most important factors are:

  • The child’s age is (or children)
  • The distance between the parents’ homes
  • Before the divorce, how involved was each parent in the care of the children?
  • What kind of decision have the courts made if they’re involved?

80 20 Parenting Plan

It’s critical to understand that all custody agreements can be customized. It’s difficult to get a visitation arrangement based on the needs and availability of both the parents and the child; thus, all variables must be considered. Using a court-appointed mediator and a co-parenting software can assist the two parents in determining what works best for them.

The custody plan can depend upon two situations, i.e., if parents live near each other and when parents live further apart. These situations are explained below in detail.

If the Parents Live Near Each Other

There is more flexibility in how custody schedules can be set up when parents live close to each other. The closer the parents live together, the more flexibility they have. Parents should ideally live within an hour of one another for these choices to function. Until School/Toddlers (Around age four to five).

When possible, toddlers benefit from frequent interaction with the non-custodial parent. Because toddlers (and even pre-schoolers) are still forming ties with both parents, this is the case. The visitation schedules for toddlers should be that toddlers should spend three non-consecutive overnights with the non-custodial parent every two weeks before entering school.

Overnights can be planned in a way that is convenient for both parents. In most cases, though, one overnight stay per weekend is sufficient. Once every two weeks, the third overnight is typically arranged on a weekday.

However, this may not be appropriate for all parents. Weekday overnights may be difficult for parents who work early Monday through Friday. But there are always different ways to adjust the 80/20 custody schedule.

On a weekday, the non-custodial parent could pick up the child after work. Instead of being kept overnight, they may be brought home before bedtime. Toddlers should not be separated from their custodial parent for two nights in a row. Children can successfully transition to every other weekend custody as they get older.

These schedules work well for older children and teenagers since they’ve already formed strong ties with both caregivers. In most cases, their relationship with the non-custodial parent will not be harmed by longer separations.

Three overnights every other weekend is the standard guideline with an 80/20 custody arrangement. Friday evening till Monday may work nicely for parents who live near together.

However, the non-custodial parent would be responsible for dropping the child off at school on Monday morning. If that isn’t possible owing to job obligations, every other weekend starting on Friday will suffice. These are known as weekend visitation rights.

If Parents Live Further Apart

Custody schedules can be more difficult to set when parents live far apart. This is especially true when children are younger and do best when they are not separated from their custodial parent for long periods. Each child, however, is different, and what works for one family may not work for another. Until School/Toddlers (Around age four to five)

Long-distance parenting arrangements may work successfully with one overnight every weekend until children start school. While the schedule is similar to the one discussed previously, there is one notable change. Due to distance, the one overnight on a weekday every two weeks is dropped.

There are ways to make up the majority (or all) of the lost parenting time without keeping the toddler away from the custodial parent for more than one night.

When the child is with their alternate parent, one option is to use a somewhat later drop-off time. If the usual Sunday drop-off time is 10 a.m., the schedule can be adjusted to have a Sunday drop-off time of 5 p.m. This adds seven hours to the non-custodial parent’s week, making up for most of the missing weekday visit. Teenagers and older children

With a few tweaks, the same plan for older children and teenagers can also work for long-distance parenting. Instead of remaining every other weekend from Friday through Monday, teens should be returned on Sunday so they may be ready for school the next day.

Two weekends and one weekend off is another long-distance alternative for older children and teenagers. Under this custody arrangement, the children spend two weekends with the non-custodial parent, followed by a weekend with the custodial parent. This may fit into the plan if either parent desires a specific weekend during the year.

When To Choose 80/20 Custody Schedule

There are a variety of custody scheduling alternatives available. Much of how custody is decided will be based on what the courts say and each parent’s schedule. Custody can sometimes be negotiated out between two parents.

However, there are some scenarios in which an 80/20 custody split may be the best option for you.

These are some of them:

  • When one parent has sole physical custody and the other parent has planned visitation with the children
  • When one parent is not able to spend time with the children for some reason
  • When parents live further apart
  • During the partnership (or during the children’s lives if parents were not together), one parent was the primary or exclusive caretaker of the children
  • Both parents agree on an 80/20 custody plan
  • When a single home base is best for the children.
  • The child or children have a disability that makes frequent transfers challenging.

This isn’t a comprehensive list. There could be other reasons why an 80/20 custody plan is preferred over alternative possibilities.

There are a variety of reasons why an 80/20 custody arrangement may not be the best choice for you:

  • The parent who does not have custody has more time with the child
  • The courts have granted joint custody to the parents
  • Both parents were equally involved in the care of the child before the separation
  • Both parents agree that a different custody schedule would work best in your situation; an 80/20 split in parenting time may not be appropriate.
  • Both parents come from different states or countries (which requires a very different schedule)

However, the top-rated schedule isn’t as straightforward as “every other weekend.” A Monday visit can easily be incorporated into the schedule if the parents live close to one another. You won’t have to wait 11 days between visits with the non-custodial parent this way.

The non-custodial parent’s alternating weekends are two overnights that run from Saturday morning to Monday morning.

The teen never spends more than two nights with the custodial parent and more than a week with the non-custodial parent.

Alternatives to 80 20 Custody Schedule

The following are various alternatives to 80 20 Custody Schedule when this schedule is not a better option for you:

  1. 50/50 Custody Schedule: Parents frequently desire equal participation in their children’s life. An equal custody arrangement (also known as a 50/50 shared custody agreement) may appear to be the natural answer for these families.

However, a few things must align for such a plan to operate. It’s critical to realize that 50/50 agreements operate best when the parents reside in close proximity to one another, particularly in the same school district.

While this can still work for long-distance parents, 50/50 agreements need a lot of flexibility and planning. It is beneficial when parents communicate effectively and share similar views on what is best for their children.

The Two Weeks Each Schedule is an amazing 50/50 schedule. The youngster spends two weeks with each parent in this arrangement, alternating between them. This schedule allows parents to live a little further apart than other options if both parents live nearly similar distances from the school or if the child isn’t in school yet. Separations of more than two weeks can be difficult for both parents and children.

Alternating Weeks Custody is another option for equal custody. The child spends one week with one parent and the following week with the other parent in this arrangement, as the name implies. This plan, like the Two Weeks Each, restricts exchanges and provides a more stable living environment for the youngster; however, it does come with the risk of separation anxiety.

  1. 60/40 Custody Schedule: When one parent has a bit more time to devote to the child during the week, schedules that split the child 60-40 between the parents are ideal. Even if they are unequal, they ensure that the child spends time with both parents. In comparison to 50/50 timetables, 60/40 schedules frequently allow for fewer exchanges.

The 18-12 Schedule, for example, is ideal for parents who live far away or don’t have time to see each other frequently. The child is with one parent for the first 18 or 19 days of the month, and the youngster is with the other parent for the remaining 12 or 13 days (depending on the number of days in the month).

This timetable can be changed or modified to meet the child’s and parents’ needs. Despite the fact that February can be a little confusing, this arrangement allows everyone to get into a monthly rhythm and only have one monthly handover.

Every Third/Fourth Week Custody, in which the child spends two or three weeks with one parent, then one week with the other, maybe a reasonable option for parents who only want one to two exchanges per month.

Although there are fewer exchanges and longer amounts of time with each parent, it can cause separation anxiety. Alternate Weekends, similar to the Every Weekend program but with alternating weekends, is another choice for parents who prefer two to three monthly exchanges.

Finally, there’s the Summers Only Schedule, a popular arrangement in which one parent has custody of the child for most of the summer vacation while the other has custody for the remainder of the year. Many parents adjust this schedule so that the child sees the summer parent very briefly at holidays or other times of the year, thus reducing the amount of time the child is separated from that parent.

Conclusion

Many factors influence custody decisions, but one of the most essential is determining what is in the child’s best interests.

Further, we conclude the following:

  • As the name implies, an 80/20 custody schedule involves the child spending 80 percent of their time with one parent and 20% with the other.
  • Calculating the percentage of parenting time might be difficult. In this type of arrangement, the non-custodial parent usually gets three overnight visits every two weeks. Although they can, those visits don’t have to be in any particular order.
  • Every Third/Fourth Week Custody, in which the child spends two or three weeks with one parent, then one week with the other, maybe a reasonable option for parents who only want one to two exchanges per month.
  • There are a variety of custody scheduling alternatives available. Much of how custody is decided will be based on what the courts say and each parent’s schedule. Custody can sometimes be negotiated out between two parents.

We hope you can now make legally informed choices regarding the 80 20 custody schedule.

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